Negotiator Beware of The Hidden Danger In Free Value – Negotiation Tip of the Week

“Negotiator Beware of The Hidden Danger In Free Value”

As a negotiator, what do you consider when you hear free? Do you think about the hidden danger that may lurk in something that’s free? Sure, there could be value in the offer, but you should also beware of the hidden danger in anything that’s free.

When you hear the word free, your brain goes into a sense of euphoria. The endorphins begin to flow at the thought of receiving something for nothing. In such a mindset, you can become susceptible to lowering your guard. Doing that can leave you vulnerable to unsuspecting ploys. That can occur even when you’ve planned how you’ll address such offers. When you find yourself in such quandaries, consider the following.

What’s the offer attempting to achieve:

People are motivated by their aspirations. Thus, during a negotiation when offers are extended, a goal is at the purpose of that offer. If you’re aware of that intent, you’ll be in a better position to assess its potential value. Offers are not equal. Don’t let one that appears to be free become too costly for you to accept. Examine it thoroughly.

What’s to be gained:

Sometimes, acquiring a concession in a negotiation can add value to your overall goals. If the concession appears not to contain a cost, its allure may become bewitching. Be cautious when such appears to be the case. Good negotiators accumulate chits that they can use at other points in the negotiation. Thus, while you’re receiving what appears to be free, what you’re really receiving could be an IOU.

The timing of the offer:

The timing of an offer can obscure hidden dangers. If the intent is to obtain a greater concession, a negotiator may seek smaller ones to build towards the larger one. Thus, in some cases, positioning may be the goal. That means, offering something for free may be the setup or cover up for something to come.

Always be aware of where a concession or request may lead. Since negotiations are the accumulations of gains and concessions, you don’t want to make a concession thinking that it will lead to more gains. Or, acquire gains that are too costly, compared to the concessions you make to acquire them.

What do you have to concede:

In every negotiation, good negotiators have red herrings to use as chits or diversions. They can serve as bartering pieces that don’t contain a burdensome cost to you, or as distracters from the real intent of your offer. In a best-case scenario, a red herring should be perceived as something of value that you possess that can be dangled as a sought-after desire that the other negotiator wants. The more he’d like to possess it, the greater its perceived value will be. Thus, if it doesn’t cost you anything to relinquish, you can heighten its appeal by feigning great concern to part with it. The point is, don’t weaken red herrings by relinquishing them too easily. Doing so will weaken your negotiation position.

There’s a cost associated with everything we acquire, even if it’s just the time that we invest. Because time itself has a cost. If you keep in mind that nothing’s free, you’ll maintain a more prepared mind to assess the hidden cost and hidden dangers that may be concealed in free offers. Doing so will make you a better negotiator… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

Public Speaking – 5 Steps To Get Across Good Information In A 5 Minute Presentation

The five-minute presentation can be a powerful tool to market your business. But what can you get across in just five minutes? A lot! Follow these five steps to make the most of your five minutes in the spotlight:

1. Pay Attention to Your First Impression

Your audience will make a decision about you within the first 10 seconds of your presentation. So first pay attention to looking the part. Dress like a business owner, not to do the job you do when you are at work. My husband is a personal trainer with his own business; he wears a sweat suit to work. But when he delivers a presentation about fitness, he dresses in a business casual look wearing twill pants and a sport coat over a button down or polo-type shirt with his logo embroidered on it. He dresses the part of a business owner, not a jock from the gym.

2. Have a Point

Make sure you know what you want to accomplish with your five minutes other than simply “getting through it.” Do you want your audience members to sign up for your newsletter? Buy your book or e-book? Call you for a free consultation? Be clear on what you want from your audience.

3. Don’t Wing It

Just because it’s “only five minutes” doesn’t mean this speech is less important than a longer presentation. In order to be sure you get in the information you want to share, be prepared so you will be less likely to forget an important point.

4. Don’t Take Advantage

Five minutes means just that — five minutes. Not 10 or 15 minutes. Many event planners will stop you if you go overtime, so don’t. Even those who don’t stop you will resent you taking more time from the meeting schedule than you were allotted. This is yet another reason to practice: to see how long it takes you to get through your speech.

5. Provide Value in Your Speech

Do not sell during your entire five minute presentation. Save that for the last 45 seconds or so. The rest of your speech should be used to build your credibility by showing the value you can offer. Provide some helpful bit of information; answer a frequently asked question with specific how-to advice; or show a step-by-step process of how your audience members can solve a problem they may have related to your business.

By following these steps you’ll be sure to have success with your next five minute presentation.

Kids Craft Kits – A Great Solution to Your Christmas Present Dilemmas

Christmas has become very commercial and if you have kids it can get very expensive; then after half an hour they are bored with it all. There is a solution; get Christmas presents which require input – kids craft kits are perfect to keep them occupied for longer!

If you want to guarantee that a present will be a success then you really do need to choose carefully. There are several area which need to be considered.

1. The target age. Once your kids are over three you can pretty much ignore the target age on some toys – however, this does not apply to craft kits. The age will define the expected level of fine motor skills required for the projects included. It will also define the tools required; such as craft knives and scissors.

2. The number of projects included. It is always worth getting a craft kits which has several projects. This means that if one is damaged there is always others to work on. It also means that if there are cousins or friends over during the Christmas season, there will be enough to keep more than one child occupied.

3. What is involved in the project? This may sound bizarre, but there are some kids craft kits which require placing moulds into the cooker to help them set – as all parents are aware there is more than one thing in demand at Christmas than a mother – it is the cooker! Equally anything which has smelly chemicals is not a good idea for a winter activity.

All in the kids craft kits are a great present, but there are always pitfalls. Be extra cautious with bargains as you may find that they are old stock and that the paint has dried out, the playdo is hard and the glue is incapable of holding anything together.

If you are going to invest in crafts this Christmas then make sure that you take a little time to think about them, this will ensure that you get the correct ones and that they are a success.